Research Papers & Poster Presentation

Kerala Backwaters – Paradise Lost?

National Seminar on:  "Water Climate and Tourism - is it a boon or bane to mankind & economic environment" 

Date: 11 Sep, 2013

Organized By: Department of Environment Science, Mount Carmel College, Bangalore

Author: Satyarup Siddhanta, President, ABETO Foundation

 

Abstract:

Kerala which is known to be God’s own country is blessed with the Western Ghats, Arabian Sea and network of 44 rivers. A kaleidoscope of the lush green hills, unique rainfall pattern, amazing wildlife, magical festivals, historic and cultural monuments, exotic cuisine, massive waterfalls, enchanting art form and ayurvedic medicines, Kerala is one of the most sought after destinations in Asia. Kerala also boasts on its lowest infant mortality rate, hundred percent literacy, world

class health care system and highest physical quality of life in India. Kerala is India’s cleanest state. It is an irony to see no one is bothered about the future catastrophe caused by the pollution in backwaters. It is going to the extent where the sewage waste from the house boats are also directly dumped into the water bodies without treatment. The backwaters are losing the charm with dirty and foul smelling water and hugely impacted marine life and eco system. Can we

expect this from a state which boasts about the highest literacy rate in the country and the cleanest state in India? Many of the tourist destinations revolve round these backwaters. Can we not keep the crown of being the most sought after destination in Asia? We are heading towards a situation where a slow transition is happening from God’s own country to God’s forbidden country. This paper throws light on the root causes of the pollution, its impact on tourism and remedy to prevent further damage to the eco system, tourism and environment in and around the back waters.

Biofuel: an approach to sustainable environment. How true is it?

National Seminar on:  "Water Climate and Tourism - is it a boon or bane to mankind & economic environment" 

Date: 11 Sep, 2013

Organized By: Department of Environment Science, Mount Carmel College, Bangalore

Author: Ankita Priya, Research and Development Director, ABETO Foundation

 

Abstract:

All is connected... no one thing can change by itself.” Paul Hawken

India being on the verge of surpassing China’s population by 2050 has explicitly expressed its requirement for food, fuel and economic obligation. However different it all looks but there is one interconnecting thread among the three - Water.

Water being the key driver for food production, agriculture consumes 80% of fresh water available in India. If the population thrives at this speed, need for food would increase massively that would require more water for cultivation and it would further create a gap between demand and supply of fresh water. Coming to Industries in recent decades India has drawn attention to many high end industries to make its economy more robust. This has put India on a path of fast

developing economy but at the same time it has put a burden on its existing water resources.

 

To support this fast developing economy a huge amount of fuel is required too for running machineries, transportation, etc. Due to increasing fuel prices people are forced to look out for alternative. In order to substantiate the fuel demand there is a suggestion to turn to biofuel. Most biofuel crops yearn for water and compete for already scarce water. The increasing production of biofuel puts a great strain on the water reservoirs.

Usage of sugarcane, wheat and maize to produce biofuel also means less food available for consumption which in turn leads to higher food prices. It is not only cutting down on water supply but also creating a stress over food supply. 

 

This paper aims to throw some light on how usage of biofuel produced from cash crops can cause a severe water crisis in India’s future which in turn will lead to social and economic instability.

National Seminar on:  "Incredible India lies in its Future Preservation of Water in tune with UN resolution of water conservation 

Date: 30 Sep, 2013

Organized By: Department of Tourism, Garden City College, Bangalore

Author: Satyarup Siddhanta, President, ABETO Foundation

 

Abstract:

Snow is rapidly disappearing from Africa’s snow covered peak Mt Kilimanjaro. Mt Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa standing at 5895m or 19341ft above sea level is one of the 7 summits of the world. 7 summits comprise of highest peak of each continent and climbing all 7 summits is a great achievement in mountaineering. Thousands of tourist flock to Kilimanjaro after it was made popular through the book “Snows of Kilimanjaro” by eminent author Earnest

Hemingway. Tourism from Mount Kilimanjaro plays a vital role in the country’s (Tanzania) growing economy, employment and urbanization. This is the only mountain in the world which has 6 ecological zones having Cultivation, Rain Forest, Heather, Moorland, alpine desert and glaciated summit. However Kilimanjaro is predicted to lose its entire glacier by 2022. This paper aims to throw light on the root causes of this upcoming disaster. It studies the factors like growing economy, rapid urbanization, Global warming, deforestation and Eco tourism and analyzes their impact towards these vanishing glaciers.

Mt Kilimanjaro to lose its snow crown – are we not responsible?
Developing economy destroying ecology

National Seminar on:  "Incredible India lies in its Future Preservation of Water in tune with UN resolution of water conservation 

Date: 30 Sep, 2013

Organized By: Department of Tourism, Garden City College, Bangalore

Author: Ankita Priya, Research and Development Director, ABETO Foundation

 

Abstract:

Thank God men cannot fly, and lay waste the sky as well as the earth. ~Henry David Thoreau

 

This paper aims to throw light on disaster that struck Uttarakhand a month’s back.16th June 2013, black day in history of Uttarakhand when extreme rain and landslides led to huge damage. The magnitude of disaster was unprecedented and it took away many lives and caused damage to city as a whole.

This was seen as religious misconception but the bitter truth behind this was it is caused due to unplanned tourism and illegal construction. Imagination of man created god’s fear but they forgot that man’s unplanned imagination lead to this tragedy.

As per state’s tourism data it is an established fact that the number of vehicles registered from 2004 to 2013 has seen a phenomenal increase. Due to this road has to be widened. Usage of heavy machines and continuous drilling has made the mountain fragile which is directly correlated to occurrence of landslides. Construction of hotels and stay houses has also contributed to this.

The Ganges in the upper region is exploited for hydroelectricity and building of dam. Even though estimated quota is defined due to many such odd projects they have modified the key tributaries. Due to this 80 per cent of the Bhagirathi and 65 per cent of the Alaknanda can get affected. River course was impacted due to such events and it eventually led to this mishap.

Even thought proposal to declare Ganga, Bhagirathi and Alaknanda rivers flow as an eco-sensitive zone came much before but the plea went on deaf ears. Concept of so called development has paid huge price and it is time that we rethink and revise the way we see sustainable tourism especially in regions located in and around an eco-sensitive zones.

Through this paper we aim to understand the major reasons for the disaster and also suggest some measures which can help to avoid such catastrophe in future.

ICIMOD, Nepal invited ABETO to the International Conference on "Mountain People Adapting to Change:Solutions beyond Boundaries Bridging Science, Policy, and Practice" in Kathmandu from 9-12 November 2014. In the Hindu Kush Himalayan regions, the eco systems are going through drastic climate changes. The event’s aim was to make people aware through science, policies and practices. ABETO was invited to present a poster in the poster session of the conference.

Empowering mountain people with environmental strategies: the dire need of the hour…Why, What and How?

Date: 11 Nov, 2014

Organized By: International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Nepal

Author: Satyarup Siddhanta, President, ABETO Foundation

The adverse impact of Global climate change on the livelihood of mountain people is not unknown anymore. But most of the discussions are limited to coffee table talks. This results in a reckless approach in the name of eba. The requirement now is to empower the mountain people with right strategies, skills and indepth understanding of technology behind the solution such that it has a sustainable effect and innovation can be brought in this field. It is the Mountain people who knows in and out of the mountains and if equipped with the right skills can bring in innovation through improvisation. This paper will discuss the need of this approach and depict some eba strategies that are sustainable in the long run

Poster Presentation

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